KD Tells Parents to “Swear Like A Mother”

“A recent study by Kraft Mac & Cheese revealed that 74% of moms say they’ve sworn in front of their kids. If you’re one of the 26% who say they’ve never sworn in front of their kids, you’re full of shit. Anyway…”

That’s certainly one way of starting off an ad for good ‘ol KD.

For this Mother’s Day, Kraft wants moms to swear like “mother trucking melonfarmers.” Created by agency CP+B Boulder, Kraft teamed up with Melissa Mohr, author of Holy Sh*t: A Brief History of Swearing to encourage moms to let loose a little and stop the judgement (yup, even the self-inflicted kind too).

We’re not sure how the brand landed on lines like “flippin’ goofnuggets” or “get off your monkeyflunking tablet” but beneath the surface lies some pretty purposeful values mixed with product.

This is what captured our minutes this week.

Here’s why:

1. The ad gets real about moms.

And what moms want.

Here’s the things about Mother’s Day messaging: it’s usually floral (groundbreaking), pink and purple-hued and has something to do with perfume.

It. Never. Changes.

The unfortunate thing about this messaging is that it’s not totally representative of a mom’s wants, nor is it particularly representative of their actual day-to-day responsibilities.

While it’s of course nice to promote the idea of pampering mom on her special day, it doesn’t always help generate real connections with those amazing women who do so much for us all. The typical messaging is also completely guilty of being a straight up pitch-slap.

It’s nothing more than “here’s this product, buy it for your mom.”

This not only diminishes the meaning of the brand, it also loses value to audiences.

People want meaningful connections that heighten how they feel themselves and the world around them.

Kraft does this by highlighting moms everywhere in a real light. These are moms who swear. Moms who step on lego. Moms who are just trying to get you to soccer practice on time.

Instead of creating the “ideal” for moms on Mother’s Day, Kraft says it’s ok to not always having all the loose ends together. Yes, KD does show up in the video. But the product’s screen time is minimal.

In fact, it helps strengthen the “moms don’t have to be perfect” message by positioning itself as the perfect complement to a busy mom’s lifestyle.

Now that’s how to place a product in a meaningful way. #NoJudgement

kraft-dinner-commercial-dx3-digest-KD-no-judgement

2. Kraft took a clever departure from its own previous messaging.

Swearing?! From Kraft, the family brand?!

Expletives are on the rise, people. It might be shocking coming from a brand that typically remains on the G-rated side of humour, but this departure actually works really well for Kraft.

While a lot of Kraft products are kid and teen favourites, the people who are actually doing the buying and making of the product are the parents a lot of the time.

This move works well at broadening the brand. Face it: parents swear too. And frankly, people are tired of the neat and tidy copywriting that’s been edited within an inch of its life.

Increasingly, audiences are drawn to the real and the raw as opposed to a “clean” version of the every day.

If one looks, there’s usually a tasteful way of throwing in a cuss word or two (but only if it’s on-brand). In this case, it’s great because it makes Kraft look less PR’d and less safe.

The swearing isn’t overt but is just enough to refresh peoples’ perceptions of the food brand and reinvigorate their expectations.

Now cut the horse-hockey, and pass the flippin’ mac and cheese.

Well done to Kraft and CP+B Boulder for taking the lead on Mother’s Day messaging. We were so tired of that shit-ake mushrooms of days past.

 

At the end of the day, people engage with content by lending their minutes. Content is successful when its battery is fully charged with attention.

About Ophelie Zalcmanis-Lai

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